Structured Integration vs. Cost Savings

How many times do you see “cost saving” being touted as a reason for increased use of educational technology, and most especially distance education? Time and again you will see the adoption of new technology being explained away as cost savings. All you can really do, most of the time, is roll your eyes as you know, beyond doubt, that one of two things will happen. Either (1-not bad) the new technology will wind up costing somewhat more than budgeted—owing to the training costs and other unanticipated costs associated with the adoption and integration process or (2-BAD) it will eventually be abandoned and left to lie, mostly unused, right next to all of the other money wasters that have been purchased through the years.

This does not need to be the case. Properly done, new technologies can be more effective and cheaper; just not that much cheaper. Look around at the cellphones, fuel-injected engines, “green” heating systems and such that have made our lives that much better. The same can happen in our classrooms too but we need to take a much longer view of what comprises cost saving and just plain get over the fool’s quest for that elusive magic bullet.

Cost saving should not be NOT the slashing of departmental budgets and subsequent placement of course notes online just so deficits can be handled in the short term. (Although, admittedly, here in the real world that does have to happen from time to time regardless of how high-minded we would like to be.)That helps nobody as the result will only be a degradation of services, followed by corresponding loss in enrolment. Cost savings might be better framed as the deliberate employment of suitable technologies so that, over time, better outcomes can be achieved at lower cost.

Examples include:

  • Joining classes at separate campuses or schools using videoconference or, even better, a combination of videoconferencing and web conferencing such that smaller student cohorts can be aggregated. In those instances, though, care must be taken such that the host site or the instructor site does not become the “main” site with the remote ones getting the scraps from the educational table.
  • The replacement of non-interactive lectures with series of multimedia-based presentations, preferably with interactive components, such as embedded quizzes or simulations.
  • The gradual replacement of some media types with others but only after a piloting process which (a) shows the worth of the new technology and (b) refines the methodology before full deployment. For example, it may be feasible to replace the printed materials used in a course with online versions, perhaps multimedia or eBooks.

How often has it happened—a new device and its associated procedures shows up unannounced? Perhaps it’s a new set of chromebooks, maybe its clickers, a handheld computer algebra system or a new, shiny, computer numerical control (CNC) machine for the shop class. Whatever. In it comes and with it comes a feeling that you are expected, all of a sudden, to just change everything.

Before proceeding too far it needs to be said that the expectation that you need to change right away if often imagined. It’s been my experience that those responsible for high level decisions do tend to also have a healthy sense of what everyone is up against. After all, the funding that permits that sort of upgrade, itself takes years to put together. The problem is that the expectations that led to the upgrade are often not well understood by those who are expected to implement the change; there’s often a disconnect. Nonetheless, those on the front lines tend to be confronted by a somewhat intimidating set of equipment and feel a corresponding sense of stress on account of what they know needs to happen.

Of course that is just a bit silly. Change does not happen that way. Yes, we are all intelligent and capable of change but none of us is foolish enough to react to every new thing that comes our way, whether invited or not. The change and integration process happens in stages. Assuming that the technology is not another blind alley (and they do happen) it usually plays out something like this:

  1. Familiarization: You have to learn how the equipment works at the most basic level. What’s it for? What do the controls/menus do? What options do you have? In situations like this it’s good to have access to an expert. A demo followed by hands-on activities can be quite useful at this stage.
  2. Utilization: You have to become comfortable with using it. It’s not enough to know what each component does but you have to become adept in its use. Nobody wants to make clumsy or false moves in front of an audience so you need time to practice. If, for example, the device in question is a handheld computer algebra device then use it for your own purposes for a semester or so before even attempting to build lessons around it. If it’s an IWB then you need to take some time to engage in unstructured use—play—with the device in a non-threatening environment. Just close the classroom door and fly solo or, better still, gather a small posse of like-minded colleagues and have a collaborative session.
  3. Integration: Bit by bit you make the use of the technology a part of the natural routine. While you can bring it in all at once it’s much less stressful to layer its use in here and there. If, for example the device is an IWB, instead of ditching your existing lesson plans, try instead to catch the low hanging fruit; that is to redo some of the lessons than lend themselves best to an IWB approach. If it works well, try another and so on.
  4. Reorientation: In time you may find that the “new” equipment and associated methodology becomes your standard approach. That set of chromebooks that you used to despise may, in time, become treasured additions to your classroom; perhaps even indispensable. This will not happen overnight and the stages are likely measured best in semesters, maybe even years.
  5.   Evolution: With new standards come new horizons. You may find unexpected applications of the once-unfamiliar technology. Perhaps you even spot yet another—and for now unfamiliar—set of methodologies that bears promise.

Of course equipment will still arrive unexpectedly and instructors will, to some extent, have to sort it out as best they can. The best advice is to realize that regardless of what else happens the integration process will come in stages, so act accordingly.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Structured Integration vs. Cost Savings

    1. And in the meantime people will need to wait to see the results 🙂
      This is one of the dangers with tech integration. Far too often the critics pan the project because it fails to produce the promised results within the first year. As a result many projects get canned just before they are about to become successful.

  1. This reminds of the times I had to justify investments to management. In my point of view you could justify anything by some back-of-the-envelope calculation – but usually error bars are bigger than the absolute values. How to quantify users’ “productivities” or “security”?

Comments are Welcome!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s